Friday, July 25, 2014

Forgotten Photo Friday, Caspian Terns

Last April I took a trip to the Sonny Bono Slaton Sea National Wildlife Refuge. Out on Obsidian Point, I bumped into some old friends from the West. The Caspian Tern is the world’s largest tern. This is the first time that I’ve seen them with fish. As if the tern isn’t big enough, look at the size of that fish!

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

The tip of the day is how to deal with the bright overcast conditions. The humidity was high and shooting a white bird against a bright gray sky is challenging. If I let the camera work out the exposure, it would have come out all gray. So when you shoot white on white, increase the exposure. Here I set the exposure compensation to +2EV. In the “darkroom” I added another 0.5EV.

In the “darkroom”, I dropped the image down by 2EV. This represents what the camera would have given me.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

This is what came straight out of the camera, with the exposure compensation set to +2 EV. Adding 2 stops of shutter speed will lengthen the exposure, so if you do this, mind your shutter speed. At ISO250, I was shooting 1/1250sec with f/5.6. Plenty of speed.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

In the “darkroom” I bumped it up another 1/2EV. This is a matter of taste. The bill color on these birds were dark orange. They can be a deeper red. I decided not to tweak.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Western Gulls

With all of the gulls that I post, one would think that I’m good at gull identification. Well, when I’m in Gloucester, yes! In California, it’s another story. I just know that I see something that isn’t quite “Herring”. So I shoot it.

These are Western Gulls that I shot at Drakes Bay Oyster Company in Inverness, California.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

Check out the bill structure and color with the lone red dot. The gray backs and the pink legs. The backs are a little darker than the Herring.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

White-crowned Sparrow

Life is hard enough when you have kids to feed and you are molting. Getting blown off a rock wall by a gust of wind from behind just makes matters worse.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

Taken on Point Reyes in Inverness, California.

Be sure to visit Wild Bird Wednesday this week.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The Last Two Oysters, Death of a Family Business

We spent a week in Morin County, California. We saw signs all over the place, “Save our Drakes Bay Oyster Farm”. What’s this all about? I decided to look for myself. So I took a drive out to Point Reyes National Seashore and I found Drakes Bay.

Three hours before I arrived, the Supreme Court of the Unites States decided not to hear the case launched by Drakes Bay Oyster Farm to save their family business. The National Park Service, showing the same lack of intelligence as the Bureau of Land Management under James Watt, has done a great wrong.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

These were the last two oysters sold at Drakes Bay on the day the last card was played by the government, demonstrating that our elected and appointed officials are fully incapable of assimilating data and make sound decisions.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

A family business, fully sustainable with a positive environmental impact was forced to close.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

We see the government closing down fishermen here on the east coast, further demonstrating that if you do not have a small army of layers to do you dirty work, you are at risk.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

I asked them, “What is your recourse at this point?” After eight years of litigation, they are done. There is no recourse. Local jobs are gone. A family that held the land in stewardship is out of business. On July 31st, the doors will close forever.

I was told I could go anywhere on the property I wanted to, except on the docks. “We are not allowed to repair our infrastructure, so it is not safe for the public.” Since they were under court orders, they had not been able to repair their docs for years.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

The oyster farm had a positive impact on the land and the environment. It was stated when Point Reyes became a part of the National Parks Service, that the oyster farming and dairy farming would be preserved. Oyster farming, a proper use of a great resource. The land on Point Reyes is dotted with dairy farms. These farmers should be nervous. My prediction is that they will be next.

I talked with restaurateurs and locals. I did not meet one person who agreed with the National Parks Service on this. With all the people I talked to, one would think I would have heard something bad. Okay, I didn’t talk to anyone in the Park Service. Why should I? They have already demonstrated a lack of ability assimilate and process data correctly. But think for yourself and make your own decision.

©2014 Steve Borichevsky

How were the oysters? Damned tasty! I’m not an oyster person, but I ordered them three times that week.

Related Posts with Thumbnails